Evaluating my Inuit Illustration Residency with the Museum team

As far as the Inuit residency went from my perspective and the museum team’s, it was a very positive learning outcome for all.

To round things off after the exhibition ‘The Land that Faces Away from the Sun: Changing Lives on Baffin Island’ at Nuneaton Museum, the team and I got together a final time. We wanted to spend a day to evaluate the project from start to finish. With projects like this, it is always good to reflect, learn and improve for the possibility of the next time….

So we began with asking ourselves one main question that overarched the whole ‘Tales of the Tundra:

Whiteboard with question: 'What are the lessons learnt from this project in particular providing access to collection & artist led workshops when working with pupils with Special Education needs and Behavioural Disorders?'

Starting off the day

After much discussions about specific successes from the workshops held at the museum with children from Arc School in Church End, Cultural Curator of Kedleston Schools Robin Johnson joined us to evaluate their learning and engagement. We decided to look at the time line of our residency and the times we engaged the school pupils with the museum, the planning involved with me (the Illustrator) and with the museum and the Inuit Collection. Robin has written an article about this on the Museum Practice website: http://www.museumsassociation.org/museum-practice

post it notes noting learning outcomes from the museum team and Illustrator Jhinuk Sarkar from the 'Tales of the Tundra' Illustrator in residence

Timeline of residency – an overview of what we would have done in hindsight to get further impact.

It was useful to pick the residency timeline apart and look at it in detail. We looked at where we would refine it and spend more time or start earlier on different aspects- if only we had a time machine!

post it notes noting learning outcomes from the museum team and Illustrator Jhinuk Sarkar from the 'Tales of the Tundra' Illustrator in residence

Timeline of residency – part 1

post it notes noting learning outcomes from the museum team and Illustrator Jhinuk Sarkar from the 'Tales of the Tundra' Illustrator in residence

Timeline of residency – part 2

post it notes noting learning outcomes from the museum team and Illustrator Jhinuk Sarkar from the 'Tales of the Tundra' Illustrator in residence

Timeline of residency – part 3

In the afternoon the team looked more closely at how I engaged with the collection, how much input I had in exhibition planning with the museum team and the exhibition space. We looked at what the benefit and pitfalls were for us all – and most importantly for museum visitors and me: where and how it developed my practice as an artist.

To finish our evaluation for the day we looked at the impact it had on partner organisations, other museums, social media engagement (from you lovely blog readers, Twitter-ers and Facebook fans) and visitor engagement (what did those of you who saw the actual exhibition think?). We went through visitors’ comments about the exhibition content, display, interest and looked at where you all came from to see my work. It was all a very useful amount of information for me and the museum to take on board.

Inuit teacher's bag with beawork in 'Inuktittut' language

Inuit teacher’s bag with beawork in ‘Inuktittut’ language

I’m going to leave the blog-reading audience hanging to see a reminder of images from the exhibition in a blog post to follow shortly.

If you have any further feedback please do not hesitate to leave a comment here.

Thank you all for your interest!

Jhinuk

Line illustration of Baffin Island in blue ink

Line illustration of Baffin Island in blue ink.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Collections, Events, Exhibitions, Learning, News, Tales of The Tundra and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s